Brexit is Least Concerning Issue for Majority of UK Landlords

Almost two-thirds of landlords have no plans to sell their buy-to-let properties over the coming year…

Landlords remain optimistic about the buy-to-let market despite recent regulatory and tax changes, according to the latest Landlord Sentiment Survey by lettings agency Your Move.

In a survey of over 1,000 landlords, more than half (52%) felt positive about current market conditions, with almost two-thirds (64%) stating they were unlikely to sell a buy-to-let property in the next 12 months.

Just 16% expressed negative feelings towards the market, whilst 30% responded to the survey as being “indifferent”.

The poll also revealed that for 83% and 80% respectively, the most important considerations for landlords are the costs of upkeep and property maintenance, and the ability to make a long-term profit.

Brexit was the least pressing issue for landlords, with just 32% expressing concerns towards it, whilst under half (43%) regarded the upcoming tenant fees ban in England & Wales as a potential problem.

“Given the number of regulatory and tax changes in the buy to let market over the last few years, it wouldn’t be surprising if landlords felt some trepidation about the future,” said Martyn Alderton, national lettings director for Your Move and Reeds Rains.

“However, it’s great to see that the landlords we surveyed do, for the most part, remain positive about the future.”

He concluded: “Our research shows the majority of landlords are in it for the long term and that’s important for the well-being of the private rental sector, providing much needed homes for those who cannot yet afford, or do not wish to purchase due to lifestyle choices.”

Rents to Climb by 15% By 2023

Upgraded projections follow a drop in new landlord instructions

Over the next year, rents are due to increase by 2% nationally, due to further drops in the supply pipeline and a rise in tenant demand exerting upward pressure on rental growth.

This trend, reported by the latest survey from the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), is said to become more impactful in the medium-term, with a cumulative surge of 15% expected by the middle of 2023.

The survey shows that a net balance of 22% of survey respondents reported a drop in new landlord instructions, falling in negative territory for the eighth consecutive quarter.

According to RICS’ chief economist Simon Rubinsohn, the lettings data reflects the impact of recent tax changes on the supply of buy-to-let properties. Commenting on the figures he said:

“The risk, as we have highlighted previously, is that a reduced pipeline of supply will gradually feed through into higher rents in the absence of either a significant uplift in the build-to-rent programme, or government-funded social housing.

“At the present time, there is little evidence that either is likely to make up the shortfall. This augurs ill for those many households for whom owner occupation is either out of reach financially or just not a suitable tenure,” he concluded.

What an interest rate rise means for you

A borrower with a mortgage of £100,000 will see an increase of £12 in their repayment, according to the Nationwide.

The UK's wealth disparity has been reveaeled
Image: People with a standard variable rate mortgage of £100,000 will pay £12 more a month

The Bank of England has raised interest rates to their highest level in almost a decade but what are the effects of an interest rate increase on day-to-day finances?

:: Who are the winners and losers?

It is a modest increase of 0.25 percentage points to 0.75%. Households can expect the cost of their loans and mortgages to go up as banks and lenders lift their interest rates.

Savers, who have had the most to complain about in the low-interest rate environment, may see a modest gain.

:: What will be the impact of my mortgage?

Skipton Building Society chief executive David Cutter told Sky News that most new mortgages are fixed for two- to five-years.

“The vast majority of new loans, 90% are on fixed rates. Back book (older mortgages) about 66% so there is going to be no immediate impact regarding affordability,” Mr Cutter said.

This is why interest rates have been raised by the Bank of England

This is why interest rates have been raised by the Bank of England

As the bank took its decision today, the mood could hardly have been more different from the crisis days in 2009

“On an average mortgage, if they do increase by a quarter of a percent, then I think your monthly payment will go up by £16 or about £190 a year.”

According to the Nationwide Building Society, anyone on a standard variable rate will see an increase of £12 on a mortgage of £100,000 and on a £200,000 mortgage, £25.

:: Why will savers benefit?

“The good news, of course, the rest of our membership, we have a million now, is the saving side because they have really suffered for ten years now. If rates do go up to 0.75% that will be highest since early 2009. So hopefully some relief is coming down the line as well,” Mr Cutter said.

Asked by business presenter Ian King whether the full rate increase would be passed on to savers, Mr Cutter responded: “Yeah, we’ll see what the reaction is in the market.”

While savers may be hoping for better returns, Bank of England statistics show that the average interest rate on UK current accounts increased by only 0.09% in the seven months since rates were increased by 0.25% last year.

:: Will this bring down prices at the shops?

While the Bank of England has raised interest rates partly to tackle inflation, this move will not be reflected in everyday prices for some time to come.

It took six months for the effects of the Brexit-hit pound to raise prices as imports became more expensive.

Retailers fear rate rises as higher mortgage and other bills for consumers mean they will have less money to spend.

The BoE predicted that inflation would be 0.1 percentage points higher this year and next at 2.5% and 2.2% respectively.

Value of UK property market falls £26.9bn as house prices stagnate

he value of Britain’s housing market has fallen by £26.9bn, or 0.33pc, since the start of the year, as growth in the North East and Wales has failed to counteract falling prices in many other regions across the country.

The nation’s homes decreased in value by an average of £927 each between Jan 1 and June 30 this year, and are now worth a collective £8.2 trillion, according to figures from property site Zoopla.

While the value of the housing market in the North East has risen by 3.31pc, and Wales’ by 1.4pc, poor-performing regions such as the South West, which endured a decline in value of 2.51pc, and Yorkshire and The Humber (-2.12pc), has dragged the overall market value down.

It marks a reversal of fortunes for the UK housing market, which registered an increase in value of 3.5pc in 2017, despite a slowdown in London and the South East.

Zoopla’s most recent data found that on a local level, the English town of Barrow-in-Furness in Cumbria was the top-performer in terms of house price growth, with prices rising 6.7pc in the past six months. Holt in Norfolk experienced second-best growth of 6.27pc, followed by Pontypool in Torfaen (6.06pc).

By comparison, Reigate in Surrey saw price growth in the first half of 2018 decline in value by 6.7pc. The second and third largest reductions were seen in Lydney in Gloucestershire, and Sturminster Newton in Dorset, which reduced in value by 6.69pc and 6.64pc, respectively.

Despite property prices in London falling at their fastest rate since February 2009, the capital’s homes collectively rose in value by an average of 0.75pc in the six months to June 30.

Zoopla’s Laurence Hall said it was “not surprising” to see a small drop in values since the start of the year.

“Uncertainty around Brexit is a very real factor in the market, however on the positive side, the drop is creating a potential opportunity for first time buyers to get a foot on the ladder in some regions across Britain,” he said.

Analysts have blamed Brexit for the slowdown in the UK’s property market since 2016. House prices have risen more slowly than before the EU referendum, which hit consumer confidence and spending as the pound’s fall pushed up inflation.

According to figures from Nationwide in April, house prices were growing by about 5pc a year around the time of the Brexit vote, but in 2018 growth has consistently hovered around 1pc.

A buoyant property market depends on the UK’s economic health, so if the pound weakens further, inflation surges, and interest rates are raised, the capacity for house price growth would be reduced.

Equally, if Brexit negotiations are successful, economic growth continues to remain positive, and confidence is boosted, house prices could increase faster than initially thought.

Source The Telegraph

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/house-prices/value-uk-property-market-falls-269bn-house-prices-stagnate/

Brexit Bulletin

Brexit Bulletin

304 Days to Go

Today in Brexit: While the Irish border and customs arrangements are the most pressing concerns, work on everything else needs to accelerate. And there’s a lot left.

The U.K. Parliament is in recess, but London has its homework to do. Brussels expects British negotiators to return next week with a clear plan about how the government proposes to solve the Irish border problem. The European Commission insists a backstop – the solution that will have to do until something better comes along – can’t be the government’s U.K.-wide customs arrangement with the European Union.

But amid all the talk about the Irish border and the endless customs union debate, it’s easy to forget there’s still a lot else that needs to be hashed out by October. The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, used a speech in Portugal over the weekend to spell out the differences. The system for settling disputes – which the EU maintains must include a strong European Court of Justice role but which the U.K. wants to be run by joint political committee – also needs to be included in the final text of the Brexit treaty.

The details about the foundations of the future relationship – which includes trade, ddefenceagreements, financial-services arrangements and regulations for industries such as fishing – are supposed to be completed by October, too.

A senior EU official raised British hackles last week, accusing the U.K. of chasing “fantasy” ideas and failing to accept responsibility for the consequences of walking away. In a background briefing for reporters, given on the condition of anonymity, the official laid out areas of dispute. From the EU’s perspective, here’s where these stand:

  • Mutual recognition of standards and regulations in areas such as food safety and financial services
  • Security: The U.K. can’t stay in Europol or take part in the European Arrest Warrant system, the EU believes
  • Foreign policy: The EU is unlikely to comply with a U.K. request for a significant say in decision making
  • Galileo satellite navigation system: The U.K. can’t turn the program into a U.K.-EU joint project and have privileged access which could give it the right to turn the system off unilaterally, the EU says
  • Data protection: The EU is unlikely to allow the U.K. to have a bespoke agreement that would lead to the EU losing its autonomy over privacy rules

There’s much work to do over the summer to lay the plans for the full-scale negotiation on the two sides’ post-Brexit ties. “Time is running out,” Barnier warned on Saturday. “If we want to lay the foundation for our future relationship before the withdrawal of the U.K., we must accelerate.”

Ian Wishart

Today’s Must-Reads

  • The Financial Times’s Tony Barber argues there’s a fierce battle emerging over the future of the EU that’s been ignited by the crisis in Italy
  • Bloomberg Opinion’s Mohamed A. El-Erian says markets fear a populist backlash in the country

Brexit in Brief

Air Agreement | The U.K. is ready to agree to an “open skies” agreement with the U.S. this summer that will keep planes between both countries flying after Brexit, the Daily Telegraph reports, citing four unidentified sources. The newspaper also says the EU has moved to shut the door on British and other non-EU companies participating in the European Defense Industrial Development Program.

Carry On Spending | Britain will help to determine the EU’s 1 trillion-pound budget up to 2027 after European countries defied Brussels and invited British officials to take part in negotiations, the Times reports. The European Commission was opposed to the plan devised by individual member states, the newspaper says.

Scotland in Brussels | Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon reiterated her goal for the U.K. to remain in the customs union and single market in a meeting with Michel Barnier in Brussels.

Dynamic Deals | Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson repeated his call for the U.K. to make a clean break from the EU when it leaves the bloc, warning Prime Minister Theresa May that Britain won’t be able to take full advantage of the split unless it does.

No Plan B
| The government’s preparations for a “no deal” Brexit have largely ground to a halt, the Financial Times reported. This will make it almost impossible for Theresa May to walk out of negotiations with the EU in the next 10 months, the paper said.

Hunky Dory | A Bank of England spokesman ,refuted suggestions of a rift between the central bank and the U.K. Treasury after a report in the Financial Times said the institutions are at “loggerheads” over the future of City of London regulations after Brexit.

 

Source https://www.bloomberg.com/brexit

Inflation and poor growth see Bank of England ditch rate rise plans

Interest rates could stay low for as long as another two years, as falling inflation and weak economic growth force the Bank of England to scrap plans to push up rates in the coming months.

Mark Carney is expected to hold rates at 0.5pc at Thursday’s Monetary Policy Committee meeting, postponing a highly-anticipated rate rise for at least three months. The freeze will disappoint savers who have laboured under historically low rates for almost a decade – and a boon to borrowers who get extra time with cheap money.

But economists now suspect that inflation will keep falling quickly towards the Bank’s 2pc target, making it harder for policymakers to raise the rate.

Poor GDP growth at the start of this year and signs of a slowing global economy could also dent the Bank’s longer-term inflation estimates.

If that forces it to cut back its inflation forecast then the case for higher rates could evaporate altogether.

“They are stuck. The Bank can’t raise rates now, the economic numbers have been too weak recently,” said Martin Beck at Oxford Economics. “They should not have raised rates in November, closed the term funding scheme or worried that credit growth was too strong – those three things have contributed to the economy slowing.”

Markets are currently pricing in only two rate rises by August 2019, but George Buckley, an economist at Nomura, thinks even this may be too many if inflation is slowing sharply.

“Should the Bank publish a forecast with inflation below target based on market rates that would be quite a statement, as it would imply that even limited market pricing for rate hikes might prove too much,” he said.

UniCredit’s Daniel Vernazza believes it will be at least another year before rates rise to 0.75pc.

Kallum Pickering at Berenberg Bank fears the Bank has missed its chance. “They should have hiked by this stage of the economic    cycle, but they cannot do it now because of the soft data,” he said.

One Third of Millennials Will Continue to Rent in Their Retirement

The number of families with children living in rented property tripled between 2003-2016…

The Resolution Foundation has proposed a series of reforms aimed at protecting tenants and landlords in the private rented sector.

According to the think-tank’s research, half of all millennials – people born between 1980 and 1996 – will be living in rented property up to their 40s, whilst a third are likely to be renting beyond retirement.

Furthermore, four out of ten millennials aged 30 are already renting, double the rate of the previous generation and four times that of baby boomers, whilst the number of families with children lived in the private rented sector has grown substantially, from 0.6m in 2003 to 1.8m in 2016.

Although they acknowledge the policies the government has introduced to make housing more accessible for first time buyers, the Resolution Foundation argues that more needs to be done to provide greater security for those that rely on renting.

This includes short-term measures such as proposals for indeterminate tenancies, which are essentially open-ended leases. Such tenancies are already in use in parts of Europe, including Scotland.

A new tribunal system could also be created, in order to resolve disputes in a timely and cost-effective manner.

Lindsay Judge, a senior analyst at the Resolution Foundation, notes that support needs to be available across all areas of the housing market: “While there have been some steps recently to support housebuilding and first-time buyers, up to a third of millennial still face the prospect of renting from cradle to grave.

“If we want to tackle Britain’s ‘here and now’ housing crisis we have to improve conditions for the millions of families living in private rented accommodation.”

Extent of North-South Renting Affordability Gap Revealed

Households outside London spend an average of just over half their income on renting…

Households renting in London are putting a significant percentage of their income towards rent compared to the rest of the country, according to new data from Landbay.

Annual rental growth in the UK, excluding London, rose to 1.21% in March, bringing the average monthly rent to outside the capital.

In London, the average monthly cost of renting is more than double the national average, at 2100

However, the average disposable income for a worker in the capital is per 2455 month. As a result, 89% of their take-home pay is used on renting.

Outside the capital, rental payments amount to just over half (52%) of the average disposable income, which is per 1760 month.

In England, renters in the North East have the lowest percentage (41%) of their incomes going towards rent, followed by Yorkshire & the Humber (43%), the North West (44%) and the East Midlands (44%).

“Rents have continued to rise over the last five years, increasing by 9% across the UK since March 2013 and by 7% in London,” notes John Goodall, CEO and founder of Landbay.

“Not a day goes by when there isn’t more news about the supply-demand mismatch in the UK housing sector and until this is resolved, tenants will continue to rely on the private rented sector to support them.

“With the right property and the right location, there are attractive yields to be had, and consistent rental demand will drive returns in the long-term,” Goodall concludes.

 

Midlands Cities Among Top 10 Buy-To-Let Property Postcodes

London commuter belt towns fall down the rankings as Northampton, Leicester and Birmingham surge

Three of the top five locations for buy-to-let property investments are in the Midlands, according to new research.

Northampton, Birmingham and Leicester were all cited as top postcodes for buy-to-let, with strong rental growth of 2.38%, 3.91% and 4.35% respectively, according to independent mortgage lender LendInvest.

Whilst the Midlands regions have been steadily rising up the rankings, the report highlights the South West region as an up-and-coming market, as strong rental growth and healthy market activity has boosted the profile of cities like Bristol, Swindow, Truro and Gloucester.

Conversely, London and the South East continue to underperform, as declining rents deters further investment in these regional markets.

Historically strong performing commuter towns like Dartford, Romford and St Albans have recent begun to slide down the LendInvest buy-to-let rankings, in some cases by as many as 58 places.

However, the report notes that demand for housing will continue to support future growth: “Political changes are increasingly underpinning this uncertainty in the market, however the need for housing around the UK prevails.

“As such, we can expect the rental market to grow, with investors prioritising yields and rental price growth as valuable metrics to consider when purchasing a property.”

Over the last 10 years, rents have grown by 16% nationally, according to figures from Rightmove.

 

Buy-To-Let Investors Target North West and South East

Two-fifths of landlords are planning to purchase more property in 2018

Landlords in the UK are optimistic that their buy-to-let (BTL) property portfolios will continue to perform well in 2018, despite the challenges the market faces from Brexit-related uncertainty and affordability stress tests.

According to the annual ‘buy-to-let barometer’ by Shawbrook Bank, 65% of investors were confident in their portfolio, whilst just 14% of respondents were concerned.

Growing returns and rising demand were cited as the two primary reasons for the confidence, as 21% of landlords had seen an increase in tenant demand in 2017.

Meanwhile, investor sentiment towards the UK economy is waning due to lacklustre growth and the uncertainty surrounding Brexit, as more landlords in 2017 (42%) expressed concern than in 2016 (33%).

Despite this, appetite for buy-to-let property remains healthy, with 39% of landlords planning to invest in an additional property in 2018, whilst expressing a strong preference for property in the North West and South East regions.

Commenting on the data, Karen Bennett, managing director of Shawbrook Bank commercial mortgages said: “There’s a healthy dose of uncertainty around at the moment, but the BTL market is showing its resilience. Property continues to offer an excellent underlying investment vehicle for professional landlords with the right investment strategy.

“Whilst the investment case for BTL remains strong, there are particular challenges ahead for portfolio landlords and the additional impact of the PRA (Prudential Regulation Authority) changes.

“Landlords now face much more stringent affordability tests and it’s therefore more important than ever than landlords are clued up on their obligations as the market continues to get even more complex.”

Economy wobbles as factories and building sites stall – putting May interest rate hike in doubt

Economic growth slowed again in February as the construction and manufacturing industries both stalled, a pair of oil refineries closed for maintenance, and the export boost from the weak pound began to fade.

The Bank of England had already cut its first-quarter growth forecasts from 0.4pc to 0.3pc because the icy Beast from the East made families stay at home instead of hitting the shops. But now economists fear even this estimate is too high.

The new figures “look consistent with GDP growth slowing to 0.2pc in the first quarter – below the Monetary Policy Committee’s 0.3pc forecast – from 0.4pc in the fourth quarter, casting doubt over whether a May rate hike is as likely as markets currently expect”, said Samuel Tombs at Pantheon Macroeconomics.

 

“We estimate that economic growth nudged lower to 0.2pc in the first quarter of 2018,” he said.

“The main reason for the weakness was severe weather in March, which is likely to have disrupted activity in all major sectors of the economy.”

Manufacturing output fell by 0.2pc in February, the Office for National Statistics said, and January’s 0.1pc expansion was also revised down to zero.

Falling output of electrical goods, machinery, textiles and plastics hit the figures.

Growth in industrial production overall – which includes manufacturing as well as industries such as mining and quarrying, and utilities – slowed to 0.1pc for the month.

A major cause was that two of the UK’s six refineries were closed for refurbishment. However, growth was supported by February’s unusually cold weather, which boosted domestic energy consumption.

Mark Carney at the Bank of England is expected to raise interest rates to 0.75pc next month – but this weaker data could make him think again Credit: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg

At the same time construction output tumbled by 1.6pc in the month, defying expectations of a 0.9pc increase. This drop may not be entirely weather related. The ONS said maintenance work led the decline, even as residential building and infrastructure construction increased.

The trade deficit increased in the three months to February, rising by £0.4bn to £6.4bn, as a dip in imports was more than offset by a larger fall in exports – which the ONS said coincided with a strengthening of the pound.

However, the overall slowdown may only be a temporary wobble, rather than a longer-term slowdown in the economy.

“While a continuation of such news may generate some nervousness in markets about whether the Bank of England will deliver another rate hike next month, it is worth pointing out that there is another full round of economic news before the Bank announces its decision,” said George Buckley at Nomura.

“We continue to expect a 25-basis point move on May 10 on the assumption of better economic news to come.”

Chief economist Lee Hopley at manufacturing industry group EEF said: “The data looks more like a temporary wobble than a turn for the worse. Whilst other indicators may have softened since the start of the year, ongoing growth in the global economy should continue to spur growth across manufacturing in the coming quarters.”

Source https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2018/04/11/economy-wobbles-factories-building-sites-stall-putting-may/

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Rental Rates Increased Nationally by 16% Over Last Decade

East and West Midlands top annual rent increases in Q1 2018

 

Rental growth has remained stable in the first quarter of 2018, the latest Rental Tracker from Rightmove suggests.

 

Excluding Greater London, the average asking rent for all tenures has risen by 0.9% annually, compared with an annual increase of 0.7% recorded in the final quarter of 2017.

 

This comes despite rents being down on a quarterly basis by 0.2% between Q4 2017 and Q1 2018, bringing the average asking rent per month to

 

The East Midlands was the strongest performing region for annual growth, with asking rents rising by 2.6%, followed by the West Midlands (1.9%), Wales (1.8%) and Yorkshire & the Humber (1.5%).

 

In the capital, asking rents for Q1 2018 were down 0.1% year-on-year, but had increased 0.2% from Q4 2017.

 

Looking back on the last decade, the data shows that the cost of renting a two-bedroom home has increased nationally – excluding London – by 16% in 10 years, and 25% in London.

 

“A look at the first few months of this year shows the usual seasonal trend of asking rents falling slightly compared to the last quarter of the last year, but we’re likely to see a rise again next quarter,” Rightmove’s housing market analyst Miles Shipside said.

 

“London asking rents remain flat compared to this time last year, a sign that we are highly unlikely to see the same big increases over the next ten years that we’ve seen in some areas in the capital over the previous ten years.”

London property market moves out of boom phase, says Rightmove

The capital’s housing market lagged the rest of the UK in 2017, and there’s little to suggest any upturn is in store

London’s property market has moved out of its boom phase, and home sellers need to be more realistic about their price demands, according to Rightmove.

The February report from the home-listing website shows that asking prices were down 1 per cent from a year earlier, a sixth consecutive fall. They rose 4.4 per cent on the month, reflecting the usual jump at the start of the spring season.

The capital’s housing market lagged the rest of the UK in 2017, and there’s little to suggest any upturn is in store. Still, while multiple reports point to a cooling in London housing, the damage is being limited by cautious sellers, who aren’t flooding the market in a panic to dump property.

That means the long-running supply-demand imbalance in the city is providing some support to prices.

“End-of-the-boom prices normally readjust more quickly if there is an oversupply,” Miles Shipside, Rightmove director, said in the report. However, “some would-be sellers are holding back, preventing a glut of competition from forcing prices downward,” he said.

The capital’s housing market lagged the rest of the UK in 2017, and there’s little to suggest any upturn is in store. Brexit uncertainty has damped demand, while years of rampant inflation has pushed ownership out of reach for many.

The mean asking price in London this month was almost £630,000, more than 20 times average UK earnings.

For those who need a fast sale, Shipside’s advice is to “sacrifice some of the substantial price gains of the last few years.” The average time to sell a property in London is now 83 days, up from 73 days a year ago.

Nationally, asking prices increased 0.8 per cent in February from January, though that was below the 10-year average for the time of year. The average price of £300,000 is up 1.5 per cent year-on-year. That compares with gains of about 6 per cent seen less than two years ago.